Shark jumping pirates

It’s Talk Like A Pirate Day but I have no enthusiasm for it anymore. After several years, pirates just aren’t that funny anymore. I think they ran their course.

Now zombies on the other hand, now you’re talking. As of summer 2005, zombies are the new pirates. Someone needs to start a “Eat Brains Like a Zombie Day” to replace this pirate one. A passing of the meme torch, if you will.

Talk about bumcakes, my girl’s got ’em

Derek’s post about robust footers at the ends of pages highlights a brilliant change he recently made during a site redesign. As peterme noted last year, Flickr was one of the first sites to use this seemingly forgotten space for useful things (in flickr’s case, a sitemap, in derek’s a sorta sitemap/intro to his other projects).

It’s weird to think we’ve all been building sites for 10+ years and “putting useful stuff at the end of a page” is a breakthrough but it really does feel like the first new layout idea in quite some time. I’ve toyed with the idea of it on the Creative Commons site since I saw the flickr implementation, but I think I’m going to test it out on my personal sites first.

links for 2005-09-15

Incredible

This slideshow (via mefi) is one of the most amazing accounts I’ve seen of the hurricane, before, during, and after. It contains photos from familiar landmarks and areas of the city and shows pretty clearly why people that stayed behind didn’t think it was going to be that bad, and as it progressed, just how bad it would get. When the story gets to the lines awaiting buses you can feel the helplessness of the people left behind.

Looking at these photos knowing what we know now, I can’t help but remember looking through a 9/11/2001 set of photographer’s photos that told a similar story of a major event: calm followed by surprise and confusion and later untold devistation.

Nothing I’ve seen on TV or online comes close to the complete story this gallery of images gives. It’s worth sitting through every caption and following along. Chilling stuff.